Check back often for the latest news, upcoming events, or the latest available at the BRING Store.

Here’s the challenge: Design and build the coolest, most practical product using donated building materials from BRING. Think furniture, games, art installations – let your creativity run wild! Working with reclaimed building materials, students gain waste prevention skills that promote reuse and sustainable material management in their daily lives. The more innovative the design, the better! Register now. Each year we invite students to submit new products made from donated building materials from our Planet Improvement Center. Each student or student team will receive $50 Challenge Cash from BRING redeemable for any used building materials in stock at the Planet Improvement Center.

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On the first anniversary of Earth Day, a passionate group of activists in Eugene and Springfield founded BRING because they wanted to do more to protect the planet we all share. They collected newspaper, glass, and other recyclables and sent them to processors so those precious resources wouldn’t end up in the trash. Over time, the organization added educational programming, a reuse store focused on saving high embodied-energy goods, business consulting, and advocacy. BRING may look much different today, but we owe our success to many of the people who were involved. On our golden anniversary, we asked current and

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The many challenges presented by 2020 meant BRING had to refocus on our core business operations for a while. And we’re giving more attention to Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) now because 2021 looks like it could be a banner year for positive policy changes in Oregon. As of right now, it looks like there may be upwards of six pieces of legislation that address EPR, reuse, recycling, waste reduction, and related issues. Below, we give a brief description of each. The last one on our list—a proposal to modernize Oregon’s recycling program—may actually be the most important. We have information

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This has been such a strange year that nothing seems completely out of the question. So visitors to BRING’s Garden of Earthly Delights could be forgiven for thinking that along with a pandemic and catastrophic wildfires, 2020 brought an alien invasion. The garden is now home to Drossian Resource Ark Glenwood Object-19 (DRAGO-19), a 12-foot-tall metal sculpture created by local artists Jeff Shauger and Joe Mross. The multi-ton object is partially buried in the ground, as if it had crash-landed in Eugene or was unearthed during an archaeological dig. With its welded body, working lights and dials, and boxes that

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Oregon’s Eco-Logical Business Program (more commonly known as EcoBiz) is a statewide service that helps auto repair shops, body shops, landscapers and car washes go green. Companies receive free consulting services that help them reduce toxins, improve worker safety and decrease pollution in our waterways, air and land. Once they’ve met a set of standards they receive a certification and help marketing their companies. They can also receive discounts on licenses and other fees. BRING took over management of Lane County’s Ecobiz program in 2015 because it’s a perfect complement to our Rethink green business consulting program. In fact, businesses

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As recent changes to plastic recycling policies have made it harder to divert waste products from landfills, a lot of people have asked why companies make containers and tubs that are so hard to recycle in the first place. Why can’t they make their packaging easier to deal with when it reaches the end of its usable life? And if that packaging isn’t easy to recycle, shouldn’t they bear some of the brunt of recycling it? That idea – that manufacturers should take responsibility for recycling or reusing the products they produce – is known as extended producer responsibility or

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One of the biggest sources of plastic waste is packaging from the grocery store. We talked to Melissa Brown, co-owner of The Kiva in downtown Eugene, about some of the ways consumers can bring less plastic home. Keep in mind that some grocery stores may not allow all of these practices, so check with them first. Bring reusable containers to bulk foods and produce At The Kiva, the plastic bags you’ve used to take home bulk goods in the past can be reused. You can also bring other plastic bags used to store dry goods such as bread or tortillas.

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