Check back often for the latest news, upcoming events, or the latest available at the BRING Store.

Despite the many heartaches and hurdles we had to clear in 2021, we are immensely proud of what we accomplished at BRING. We shored up our retail store by creating the BRINGmade product line and building out an e-commerce platform. We introduced the BRING Product Design Studio to innovate new products out of used materials and continued to provide a safe, fun shopping experience at the Planet Improvement Center. Our next entrepreneurial venture is the Oregon Rethink Business Network, a statewide coalition of local governments and nonprofit technical assistance/education providers that will help businesses improve their track record when it

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by Sophia Bennett All eyes will be on Eugene this summer when the World Athletics Championships Oregon22, the largest track and field event in the world, comes to town. This will be the first time this decades-old event takes place on U.S. soil and gives the city the chance to make the case that Oregon is the heart and home of track and field in the U.S. Events are exciting and bring tremendous economic opportunity to a region, and they aren’t without environmental impacts. Major gatherings typically generate a tremendous volume of waste. Flying athletes, their families, and their coaches

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By Sophia Bennett The COVID-19 pandemic changed everything, including Americans’ waste disposal habits. That was one of the big takeaways from two new Pacific Northwest garbage and recycling studies that were released recently. Both showed a serious uptick in the amount of trash people are generating and, in some cases, disposing of improperly. Given that the pandemic is beginning to wane, now is a good time to rethink shopping and disposal habits. That’s especially important given that the holidays, which are traditionally the most wasteful time of year, are right around the corner. Washington study shows increase in disposal rates

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The term “trash” has a bad rap. Anyone who shops in our retail store knows that what looks like waste to one person can create a more beautiful home, a satisfying art project, or a functional garden for someone else. Here’s another word to take issue with: “nonprofit.” Organizations such as BRING need a profit in order to keep our doors open, pay our employees decent wages and benefits, and provide the educational opportunities local people rely on. What sets us apart from for-profit corporations is that we plow our gains back into programs that benefit our community. Whether you

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This summer marks the third year of operation for BRING’s Construction Materials Recovery and Reuse (CMRR) Program. In partnership with the City of Eugene and Lane County, BRING developed the CMRR Program to provide education and resources to the local community of builders and developers. The primary objective of CMRR is to reduce waste during pre-construction, demolition, renovation and building construction. Construction and demolition (C&D) materials—which include wood, metal and concrete debris—represents at least 34% of waste sent to landfills in the US. BRING is actively working to reduce this figure and the CMRR Program is part of that effort.

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Feeling optimistic about the future is hard right now. Record droughts, soaring temperatures, massive wildfires, and a new surge in coronavirus infections is enough to get a person down. And I am not alone. Friends, family members, and especially my colleagues, are feeling it too. There is a term for the sadness and anxiety that many of us are experiencing.  Eco-grief is the emotional distress that is associated with the loss of the natural world due to climate change, natural disasters, and extreme weather events.  Like other forms of grief, people experiencing eco-grief may feel overwhelmed, fearful, and powerless. Recognizing

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Published in 2012, Materials Management in Oregon: 2050 Vision and Framework for Action, is a guiding document for much of BRING’s current work. This framework was developed by a work-group convened by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) that included BRING’s former executive director, Julie Daniel. The document envisioned an Oregon in the year 2050 where materials are produced and used responsibly—conserving resources, protecting the environment, and living well. BRING’s many programs focus on reducing the impacts of energy-intensive and high-priority materials, and our forward-thinking board of directors has prioritized education and advocacy for Extended Producer Responsibility policies to

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Environmentalism is about protecting the earth. And it’s hard to separate keeping the earth healthy from keeping people healthy. We all need access to things like clean air and drinking water, safe open spaces, and quality housing that we can afford. Unfortunately, people of color and low-income folks are often denied these basic necessities. They live in areas where pollution is more prevalent, either because of economic circumstances or by design. The housing that is available to them is often substandard and may be located in neighborhoods that lack access to quality food, good schools, or parks. Without a healthy

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Fifty years ago, BRING was founded to inspire action to protect the environment. Our founders believed that stewardship had to be done at a community level, for the benefit of people and the planet. Today, these principles still hold true. With climate change already permanently altering our region’s landscape and consumption on the rise, reducing waste and encouraging reuse remains critical to ensuring a sustainable future. You can help support BRING’s work. Please contribute $10, $20, $100, $1000, or more. BRING has continued to provide vision, leadership and tools for living well despite the turmoil of the past year. For

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On the first anniversary of Earth Day, a passionate group of activists in Eugene and Springfield founded BRING because they wanted to do more to protect the planet we all share. They collected newspaper, glass, and other recyclables and sent them to processors so those precious resources wouldn’t end up in the trash. Over time, the organization added educational programming, a reuse store focused on saving high embodied-energy goods, business consulting, and advocacy. BRING may look much different today, but we owe our success to many of the people who were involved. On our golden anniversary, we asked current and

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